Our Values

Mission & Vision

Mission

IAA delivers a holistic international education that exemplifies lifelong learning and responsible citizenship.

IAA belongs to the Jordanian community, fostering an atmosphere of pride and identity, celebrating our traditions, and promoting a sustainable future.

Mission

IAA delivers a holistic international education that exemplifies life-long learning and responsible citizenship.

IAA belongs to the Jordanian community, fostering an atmosphere of pride and identity, celebrating our traditions, and promoting a sustainable future.

IAA equips its students with the skills, principles and experiences that empower them to fulfill their academic, personal and social potential.

IAA promotes ethical development, intercultural empathy and a duty to the global and local communities.

 

Vision

To provide a unique educational experience that inspires, nourishes and celebrates the individual, one in which staff, students and parents are proud partners.

 

School Pillars

Duty             

Duty at IAA is commitment to serve selflessly, with no expectation of any recognition in return. It is an innate understanding that the well-being of the world can only be realized through the contribution of every citizen. Our own world extends far beyond our immediate circumstances, and the welfare of others can never be entirely separate from our own. IAA is committed to nurturing the sense of responsibility, duty and service.

Leadership

"The leader of a house is also its humble servant.” At IAA leadership stems from the fundamental principles of dignity, respect, peace, humanity, prosperity and belonging. The IAA community understands that strong and inspiring leadership is not simply a title or position, but rather requires the active development of these essential principles. Leadership cannot be divorced from character.

Cultural Heritage

Our heritage is our cultural, social, physical and intellectual identity. It celebrates our past, drives our present and helps shape our future. Jordan is a unique country that celebrates the diversity of its people, honouring the pride each individual exhibits towards their own personal cultural heritage. This is the Jordan to which IAA is proud to belong.

Acceptance

At IAA, we understand that we are one of many on this Earth. We know that our actions not only affect the world, but also reflect how the world views us. We accept people based on the universal principles of Human Rights, Human Dignity, and Fundamental Freedoms. We therefore recognize each other as equal brothers and sisters. At IAA, acceptance is the basis of all human interaction.

 

Definition of Learning

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Inspirational Learning

  • Intent: Students are encouraged to view their potential as limitless.
  • Implementation: Building a growth mindset that embodies empowerment, inclusion, diversity and equity in order to become advocates of change.
  • Impact:  Students are confident global citizens that act as a source of inspiration for others and become the change they want to see in the world.

Individualised Learning

  • Intent: Builds upon the unique strengths of each student.
  • Implementation: Acknowledging and supporting learner variability by promoting agency and equity.
  • Impact: Students are self-aware, resilient and adaptable. They have choice and voice in their learning.

 Innovative Learning

  • Intent: Promotes a culture of ‘out of the box’ thinking
  • Implementation: A varied use of teaching strategies and tools to develop problem solving and cultivate risk taking.
  • Impact: Students enjoy discovery, can think critically and are not scared to fail in the journey.

Interactive Learning

  • Intent: Involves students in the learning process
  • Implementation: Engaging students through inquiry, collaboration and reflection
  • Impact: Students can navigate the best possible route towards their goals, are independently or  collaboratively (in partnership with others).

Solving problems in the real world

Teachers will implement this by:

  • providing opportunities for students to make connections and critically solve problems through a range of perspectives from varied primary and secondary sources
  • explicitly addressing local and global issues and relating learning to the UN Sustainable Development Goals
  • developing authentic service learning.

The impact on students will be demonstrated by:

  • thinking critically through different perspectives to solve problems effectively
  • confidently engaging with controversies that involve local and global issues
  • applying a growth mindset and recognising that others can support them in solving problems.

Applying knowledge and skills to new situations

Teachers will implement this by:

  • preparing activities that focus on conceptual frameworks and higher order thinking (Bloom et al)
  • organising simulations, in familiar and unfamiliar situations, to demonstrate transfer
  • engaging students in authentic research projects, challenging them to support their arguments with evidence.

The impact on students will be demonstrated by:

  • recognising how their knowledge and skills can be applied effectively outside of the original learning conditions
  • articulating, in their own words, the experience of transferring concepts and skills in their learning.

Showing curiosity

Teachers will implement this by:

  • knowing what is important to, and valued by, the student
  • designing open ended inquiry
  • embedding learner variability into learning opportunities, facilitating student voice and choice.

The impact on students will be demonstrated by:

  • engagement and resilience to seek their own understanding to make sense of world they live in
  • their motivation and confidence to ask and answer their own questions
  • engaging with their strengths, challenges, interests and passions in personalised ways.

Acquiring knowledge and skills

Teachers will implement this by:

  • developing a detailed and holistic curriculum that challenges students
  • allowing students to be active participants in their learning and use effective questioning techniques
  • providing intentional opportunities for students to demonstrate learning and practice skills, which is augmented by quality feedback.

The impact on students will be demonstrated by:

  • articulating the connection between prior learning and what they are about to learn
  • describing how they ‘learn how to learn’
  • data, from quantitative and qualitative assessments, indicating their progress.

Synthesising to create new understanding

Students integrate knowledge from more than one discipline to create an original idea, see a new perspective, or form a new line of thinking to achieve insight. (IB MYP & Harvey and Goudvis, 2000)

Teachers will implement this by:

  • providing learning engagements for students to integrate knowledge and skills from two or more disciplines in an interdisciplinary manner
  • ensuring that students reflect on their learning before, during and after learning experiences to develop new insights
  • providing critical thinking opportunities and hands-on experiences, allowing students to construct new meaning and perspectives.

The impact on students will be demonstrated by:

  • bringing together concepts and methods from different disciplines to explain a phenomenon, solve a problem or create a product
  • experiencing the excitement of discovering something new—including insights into how disciplines support and challenge one another
  • inquiring in different contexts to form new perspectives that are logical and meaningful to them.

References

Harvey, Stephanie and Anne Goudvis. Strategies that Work: Teaching Comprehension to Enhance Understanding. Fort Walton Beach Education Club, 2020. 0310guid.pdf (stenhouse.com) .

Fostering interdisciplinary teaching and learning in the MYP For use from September 2014/January 2015

 

Global Citizenship

IAA STATEMENT ON GLOBAL CITIZENSHIP

 

Global citizenship at IAA is advocating for diversity, inclusion and equity by developing respect and compassion for the rights of others. As a result, we want our students to understand their place in the world and “take an active role in their community, and work with others to make our planet more equal, fair and sustainable” (Oxfam, 2020).

 

Global citizenship is developed through:

IAA STATEMENT ON GLOBAL CITIZENSHIP

 

Global citizenship at IAA is advocating for diversity, inclusion and equity by developing respect and compassion for the rights of others. As a result, we want our students to understand their place in the world and “take an active role in their community, and work with others to make our planet more equal, fair and sustainable” (Oxfam, 2020).

 

Global citizenship is developed through:

  • A. Knowledge and Understanding
    • The complex interconnectedness of the world economically, politically, socially, spiritually and environmentally;
    • “Our choices and actions may have repercussions for people and communities locally, nationally or internationally” (IDEAS, 2020); and
    • That global ethics are essential in developing and sustaining equity as well as justice by acknowledging our commonality as a human race.

 

  • B. Skills
    • Thinking critically through different perspectives to solve problems effectively;
    • Developing intercultural intelligence through learning to recognize our own biases and microaggressions;
    • Navigating complex issues through negotiation and mediation; and
    • Identifying the validity, objectivity and aims of sources of information.

 

  • C. Values and Attitudes
    • Developing a flexible sense of self and identity that does not marginalise others;
    • Taking action to contribute to social justice and equity;
    • Advocating for and demonstrating commitment towards the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals;
    • Acceptance of all members in society including those of a different race, gender, ability, religion, and nationality; and
    • Believing that all people can make a difference.

 

References

CIS. 2020. Global Citizenship. Available at: https://www.cois.org/about-cis/global-citizenship Date accessed 20 September 2020

IDEAS. 2020. What is global citizenship? Available at: http://www.ideas-forum.org.uk/about-us/global-citizenship Date accessed 20 September 2020.

Oxfam. 2020. What is global citizenship? Available at: https://www.oxfam.org.uk/education/who-we-are/what-is-global-citizenship/ Date accessed 20 September 2020.

UNESCO. 2019. Global citizenship education. Available at: https://en.unesco.org/themes/gced Date accessed 24 September 2020.

IAA Statement on Digital Citizenship

 

IAA Statement on Digital Citizenship

Digital citizens engage in a safe, responsible, critical, culturally competent and principled manner with digital technologies. They use all types of technology for meaningful democratic engagements for the purpose of critically deconstructing and reconstructing knowledge, skills and dispositions.

Digital citizenship is developed through the following strands:

 

IAA Statement on Digital Citizenship

Digital citizens engage in a safe, responsible, critical, culturally competent and principled manner with digital technologies. They use all types of technology for meaningful democratic engagements for the purpose of critically deconstructing and reconstructing knowledge, skills and dispositions.

Digital citizenship is developed through the following strands:

  • Access towards full electronic participation in society by understanding how the internet works;
  • Commercial skills towards electronic buying and selling of goods;
  • Electronic communication skills are developed:
    • To develop ways of thinking to critique sources of online information during the teaching and learning process in order to critically engage with the use of technology;
    • To use (net)etiquette that pertains to electronic standards of conduct or procedures through which students emphatically engage with others;
    • To create and communicate meaningful and purposeful information;
    • To use guidance law on intellectual information and copyright, to develop the skills of acting with academic integrity; and
    • To understand the ramifications of our choice on our digital legacies through our digital footprint left online; 
  • Online rights and responsibilities extend to all by respecting freedom and opinions expressed in an ethical and considerate way;
  • Develop responsible usage skills in students to determine:
    • The quality and quantity of time spent online;
    • The responsible sourcing of information to distinguish between types of information for purposeful usage; and
    • The logical intellectual engagement with the materials sourced.
Portrait of A Graduate


 

IAA’s Portrait of a Graduate symbolises the type of person an IAA education seeks to create. 

The Portrait is topped by the image of two flags: a Jordanian flag joined to a flag with a globe.  The globe symbolises internationalism, and it is joined to the Jordanian flag to show that an IAA graduate has an international outlook combined equally with a deep love for Jordan and appreciation for its culture and people.

 


 

IAA’s Portrait of a Graduate symbolises the type of person an IAA education seeks to create. 

The Portrait is topped by the image of two flags: a Jordanian flag joined to a flag with a globe.  The globe symbolises internationalism, and it is joined to the Jordanian flag to show that an IAA graduate has an international outlook combined equally with a deep love for Jordan and appreciation for its culture and people.

The centre of the Portrait is a hexagon creating the six words that represents the IAA graduate’s most important attributes.  These attributes were chosen through committee work done by all school stakeholders, including staff, parents, alumni and students. 

They include:

  • Resilient: The IAA graduate is not afraid to take on new challenges, risk the possibility of failure and try again.
  • Adaptable: The IAA graduate is prepared to ‘take life as it comes’ and change plans accordingly.
  • Responsible: The IAA graduate does what is right, even ‘when no one is looking’. The IAA graduate takes care of people and the environment as much as personally possible.
  • Confident: The IAA graduate is guided by an internal compass composed of knowledge, skill, ethics and morality.  The IAA graduate is not burdened with unproductive second guessing.
  • Independent: The IAA graduate has learned to think and make decisions.  The IAA graduate does not need to unduly rely on others.
  • Genuine: The above attributes keep the IAA graduate well-grounded and able to act from a basis of authenticity.

The shape, colour and design of the Portrait are meant to evoke the school’s symbol to visually connect these attributes to the school.

In the centre of the Portrait, there is a silhouette of a male and female graduate, who stand together, side by side.  IAA is a coeducational institution where men and women are educated to lead Jordan into its future together.

At the bottom of the Portrait, the Four Pillars are depicted to show that they are the solid foundation on which an IAA education is built.